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Announcement of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2015 was awarded with one half jointly to William C. Campbell and Satoshi ┼îmura for their discoveries concerning a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites and the other half to Youyou Tu for her discoveries concerning a novel therapy against Malaria.   The announcement can be viewed here



South Asia Grapples with Dengue

Collaboration between public health systems and communities is crucial to containing dengue viral fever in South Asia, writes Nalaka Gunawardene. There is no direct treatment for dengue and no fully effective vaccine as yet. But early detection and proper caring for symptoms — which include fever, rash, muscle pain and damage to the blood vessels — can keep death rates low. For now, the best control strategy involves destroying the tenacious vectors and protecting agains



Blood Proteins Could Help Monitor Malnutrition

[KATHMANDU] Scientists have identified a range of proteins that can be used as reliable indicators of a person's nutrient levels. The discovery means portable nutrient-measuring devices could be developed that could aid understanding of malnutrition among the world's poor.  The body needs only tiny concentrations of certain substances, which include metals such as copper and selenium and vitamins A and D, but many people in the developing world have deficiencies in such



Buffalo Genome Decoded

[DHAKA] Scientists from Bangladesh and China have jointly cracked the buffalo genome, raising hopes of using the genetic information to improve milk and meat production.  Lal Teer Livestock (LTL), an associate of the Bangladesh's largest private sector seed company Lal Teer Seed, and the Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) decoded the buffalo genome under a two-year project based on buffalo stocks from southern Hatiya Island and northern Dinajpur district.  &nbs



'Open Tree Of Life' Shows How 2.3 Million Earthlings Are Related, From Microbes To Mankind

 Researchers from multiple institutions have come together to publish Earth's most complete family tree to date, illustrating the evolutionary relationships between about 2.3 million named species of lifeforms over the course of roughly 3.5 billion years on the planet.  From insects to animals to microbes to humans, it's an extraordinary representation of known Earthlings, collected altogether on a single tree diagram. "This is the first real attempt to connect